Welcome

When life at the top becomes too lonely…


When you’re unsure of the loyalties of those around you…
When a complex situation is unfolding too quickly…
When you are negotiating a political minefield…
When your own sense of confidence and security is challenged…



The leaders’ confidant, working behind the scenes, I help them see the dynamics of situations, the politics of organisations, their own personality, and the behaviour of other people, differently; motivating them to achieve more, enabling them to formulate their dreams, and find the confidence to transform these into reality. The most senior roles in an organisation are lonely places. Leaders often find few people with whom they can discuss things – both strategic and operational, may distrust the motives of their peers, or be concerned about divulging significant information inappropriately or too early.

Often, their ideas are not yet formulated and they are concerned that using others as sounding boards may lead to rumours and speculation that grow out of proportion with consequences that could harm them, the organisation and its stakeholders. A former Big-Four consultant and multinational HRD, I know that professional advisors can have split loyalties.

Leading Oxford University’s coaching programmes, I offer uniquely qualified, strictly boundaried, support as a confidant to people in positions of power. We build a relationship of trust, in which you can discuss almost any issue affecting you at the time, knowing that this will remain between us, and my support will not be compromised by my own agendas.

My articles reflect various aspects of my work. Use the menu to select particular themes.

If you feel I might be able to help you, please call, use skype, or email.
Graham Wilson


My latest articles

  • Congruence
    One of Carl Roger’s three core conditions is ‘congruence’. I’ve come across quite a few people using this term in ways that don’t really seem quite right, and have been trying to understand why and to think of ways of explaining it differently. Some courses are more closely linked from one year to the next. ...
  • Congruence
    Some people think that this means being very transparent to our clients… In other words, if we are having a ‘bad hair day’ we shouldn’t pretend otherwise to our clients.  It is true that we don’t put on a mask for them – to do so would be deception.  However, a client doesn’t come to ...
  • The philosophy of Person-Centred (Humanistic) Psychotherapy
    https://youtu.be/EVq2NY_Rz34 Produced to support a level 4 (first-year undergraduate) course in therapeutic counselling. Share this:TwitterFacebook
  • Power dynamics in coaching, counselling, supervision, management, and teaching…
    The relationship between counsellors and their clients, supervisors and their supervisees, tutors and their students, and managers and their ‘team’, are all determined by the projections of one onto the other and how the other responds. What’s important (in my opinion) is for both parties to be aware of what they are doing and to ...
  • What’s the difference between counselling and psychotherapy?
    There’s nothing wrong with a bit of off-loading, but it doesn’t really help the client move forward in their life – “the bigger picture”. There’s an ongoing debate among counsellors and psychotherapists about the difference between the two. There isn’t an agreed answer. In the UK, there’s a project underway involving the BACP, the UKCP, and ...